Helping children stay sun safe

Each year, thousands of schools participate in the Soltan Sun Ready Schools programme, which has provided over half a million children across the UK with tips on how to stay safe in the sun.

Due to the closure of many schools in the UK, children are now spending more time in their gardens or outdoor space. That’s why Boots Soltan is making sure this important sun safety message still reaches young people by providing parents and teachers access to their Sun Ready Schools resources on their Family Hub.

Their resources are curriculum-linked and include activities such as the Sun Ready Show, Sun Ready Poster Challenge and the Soltan Sun Ready Challenge app so children can have fun whilst embedding sun-safe habits that last a lifetime.

Boots Soltan has also partnered with Macmillan Cancer Support to help make sure families stay safe in the summer sun. Take a look at their advice from the experts below, including tips on how to apply sun cream on children and how to keep little ones protected and Sun Ready.

How to apply sun cream on children
Getting kids to stay still for long enough to apply sun cream can be challenging! Here are a few tips on how you can ensure the sun cream is applied effectively and that you’re providing the best protection for your children:

  • Apply indoors, before going out in the sunshine; this will make sure the sun cream has sunk in and is ready to work before your child goes into the sun.
  • Use sun cream with a high SPF (30 or above) and a 5-star UVA rating to ensure your kids have high protection against the sun’s damaging UV rays.
  • Use plenty; most people do not apply enough, make sure you follow the instructions on the bottle to ensure you’ve got the protection that you need.
  • Remember those delicate areas. Make sure to cover all exposed skin evenly, including the face, neck and arms and encourage your kids to cover up their skin by wearing a hat and long sleeves. Reapply every two hours so that the protection doesn’t wear off. Even water-resistant sun cream can rub off so put more on after swimming and towel drying.
  • Have fun when applying; make the process fun for your children and get them to take part. Why not recite a poem while you do it – rub in the cream to the beat!

Keeping young babies safe
Be extra careful with children under six months; babies’ skin is much more sensitive than adult skin. Keep babies under the age of six months out of direct sunlight at all times.

Explaining the need for sun protection to children
Applying sun cream may seem boring, but once kids learn about how it protects them from the sun’s rays, they’ll be more likely to regularly reapply. Try applying sun cream to each other to make it more interactive. Once they’re in a routine of applying their cream before sun exposure, it will become a habit and set them up for protecting their skin in the future.

You can also use Soltan’s Sun Ready activity resources, available on their Sun Ready website, which help teach children about the importance of protecting themselves in the sun in a fun and engaging way!


About Boots Soltan
Boots UK want to help young people start sun safe habits that last a lifetime. Our free curriculum-linked teaching and family resources and will get children making the most of the great outdoors, having fun and keeping sun safe!

About Macmillan Cancer Support
Boots UK and Macmillan Cancer Support are working together to provide cancer information and support on the high street. For more information visit www.boots.com/macmillan.

If you or anyone you know has questions or concerns about cancer, talk to Macmillan on 0808 808 00 00, open 7 days a week, 8am – 8pm or visit www.macmillan.org.uk.

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